Windows 7 updates, resolved

I’ve had some trouble with Windows 7 before. (tl;dr: I installed W7 on a VirtualBox VM. After several different mistakes, it finally installed, but no updates are downloading.) After some review and investigation, it looks like Windows update is working finally. I learned quite a bit.

For starters, it turns out that I had Windows 7 Service Pack 1 installed right from the DVD. That saved some problems, but I feel foolish for not knowing that.

I kept trying google searches to figure out what was going on with the Windows update problems. Eventually, after several months, I stumbled across a pinned reddit post that explains what to do. It makes sense and I compare it to other search results. Those other pages independently confirm what I need to do: download and install a series of software update rollup files and install them piece by piece. If I do it correctly, it will work.

I quickly have trouble with an ActiveX control. For some reason, I’m asked to install an add-on named “Microsoft Update Catalog”, even though I already have it. It’s already enabled, but not appearing in the list of running add-ons in IE 11. Fine, I switch to Chrome and continue downloading what I need.

Downloading the msu files takes time. I even set up a snapshot at one point to make sure I could roll back when one update’s notes described several errors with fixes requiring updates to registry files. I worked my way through April 2015, March / July / August / September / October and November 2016 updates and I’m ready to let Windows check by itself. It works! 29 additional updates had to be downloaded and installed. I did not have to find them. Finally!

Next steps:

  • Clone the Windows VM
  • Authenticate the Windows installation in the cloned VM (I’ve had to do this once already on a VM that I eventually kicked out the airlock.)
  • Install SQL Server 2014 available from Visual Studio Dev Essentials
    • Can I say how impressed I am with the Microsoft developer tools? I’ve always been an Apple guy, but I have not been excited about Xcode and Swift 3. The Microsoft stuff is new to me, so it looks exciting.
  • Study and practice for the MCSA exams in SQL Server 2012/2014
Advertisements

Adventures with Windows, part 2

As I mentioned earlier, I had trouble loading the free update to Windows 10. I now have a 5 GB file in my Windows 7 instance, but it never finished installing. It was stuck on 99% complete install for hours. I grew frustrated and decided to punt on the install.

Some websites mentioned that the Windows 10 update needed a fully patched and updates Windows 7 system in order to finish installing. It’s possible that may be true. It’s definitely true that I needed to patch Windows 7 as soon as possible. After installing an antivirus program (Avira) along with FireFox and Chrome, I decided to run the Windows update.

That did not go well either. I selected Windows Update from the Windows Control Panel and the “Other Programs” list on various occasions. I never got the impression that anything was happening. From other websites, I knew that the initial Windows update should take roughly 90-120 minutes. I would run Windows update 3 hours with  no indication that anything was happening.

I decided to try to install Windows updates directly from the browser. My browser was immediately updated to IE 11. Immediately is relative. It still took roughly 90 minutes to download and install 14 updates for IE 11 only. Once it was done, I went back to update.microsoft.com to see if that would list files to download. I was told to set the update back to Windows Update. I did not know any better, so now going to update.microsoft.com bounces me over to Windows Update again.

I may try downloading Windows 7 SP1 by itself. Maybe that will take care of some of the missing updates. It’s possible my home download speed is too slow to download any information quickly enough. It would be nice to go somewhere with a big pipe and not a lot of traffic. Where could that be?

Adventures with Windows 10: part 1

Microsoft announced that free upgrades to Windows 10 would end on July 29, 2016. I bought a full copy of Windows 7 to load onto a VirtualBox Virtual Machine several years ago, but never got around to installing it. I realized that this week would be a good time to get that project started and finished.

A while back, I created a ISO file of the Windows 7 installer DVD. I know that my current laptop does not have an optical drive, but the older one (the one with the failing trackpad) does. I suspect I bought the installer when I had the older laptop, but I also knew that I would need an ISO, if not for a new laptop, then for the desktop, which also does not come with an optical drive. (Weird.)

I created a new VirtualBox Virtual Machine to handle Windows 7. I remember I created a virtual optical drive in the virtual machine settings and attached the ISO to that virtual drive. Everything looks ready. Let’s start. Immediately, I get a message saying “Failed. No bootable medium found.”

I aborted and checked the settings again. There was a google search that suggested I hit the F12 key during boot up. That may have solved some issues, if I had tried it. I knew I needed an external optical drive any way, in case I sell or destroy the old laptop, so I drive down to the local Apple store and buy an overpriced optical drive.

I come back home and attach it to the new laptop. I can see the Windows 7 optical disk in the finder. I misunderstand how to load it in the Virtual Machine settings and end up starting the installer from the ISO. I know because if the installer were using the disk, I should have heard spinning sounds from the optical drive, which I did not.

It looks like Windows 7 is installing this time. I know it’s supposed to reboot to finish installation. What slips from my mind is that the second time, it’s supposed to reboot from the hard drive, not the ISO / optical drive. I keep interrupting the boot process by manually booting from the optical drive. It turns out that I installed several copies of Windows 7 into the virtual hard drive until I ran out of space.

I can see this is not working, so I start over with a fresh Virtual Machine. I decide not to add a virtual hard drive after realizing that the link to an optical drive already existed. When I start the blank windows machine this time, I was asked to pick a bootable drive. I was given the option of the drive with the Windows installer or the ISO (?). I pick the drive and go through the installation again, along with my extra second installation from the optical drive after reboot.

I read a bit online. (Google is your friend.) At this point, I realize that I need to let the reboot work without interference from me. I wipe out the Windows partitions created by the Windows installer and start over.

Finally, the Windows 7 installer works. I have a running Windows 7 instance running in VirtualBox. Next steps:

  • upgrade to Windows 10 for free – nope, 99% freeze. See next post.
  • load an anti-virus application – I’ve done research on free AV
  • load all other windows updates – nope
  • install Firefox and Chrome – eventually

All of that is for another time.

Friday link dump for later reading

While trying to find some info about CakePHP 3 and its integration with AJAX, I stumbled across Zen of Coding, which had several posts on this topic. I realized I needed to find part one of his six part series, so I went to his home page. In the content list, I saw another post titled “Making Sense of Vagrant for your CakePHP or Symfony 2 project.” There, it discusses a GUI for the Vagrantfile config, based off of something called PuPHPet, a “GUI configurator for Puppet and Vagrant“. Puppet is for system administration, which I don’t do much any more. Vagrant configures “virtual development environments”.

I like the idea of Vagrant, where I can set up the same Ubuntu instance (for example) and feel confident it will work with any other Ubuntu instance running the same version (more or less). I plan on installing it (VirtualBox, then Ubuntu and maybe Vagrant) one day, when I get around to installing all the other stuff I need to load onto my machine first. For now, I have this post to remind me of all the links I want to visit very, very soon.

Yes to Gparted, but still having trouble

It turns out the /home directories in my Ubuntu VM were too small to transfer over to a separate partition. I ran “Disk Usage Manager” (I think) and discovered that one of my main directories (/usr or /lib) was using almost all the free space available. It was a good idea to use VBoxManager to boost the space available for the hard drive in the VM. However, GParted does not allow modification of the partition it’s running on.

I realized I had to run a GParted Live CD on the VM. I found the .iso file and left it on the desktop. I had to modify the VM settings to read the .iso file first when booting. Once I figured that out, I was able to run the GParted Live CD. I was still having trouble reordering the partitions of the Ubuntu VMs.

It turns out that the extra space was added at the end of the Linux swap partition, as separate unallocated space. Eventually, a Google search helped me realize that I needed to move the Linux swap space to the far end of the unallocated partition, then extend the “boot” partition over to fill the remaining space. (It’s weird. Why not just one command instead of two separate actions?) I reshuffled the partition space, rebooted and Ubuntu started again with the full 16 GB partitions correctly.

Unfortunately, I’m still having trouble with Ubuntu updates. I can finally run them without running out of free space, but I have a configuration problem where a linux-generic update depends on another file that is not loaded and that file won’t load because it’s not needed. More on that later.

useful VirtualBox command line options

I was able to bump up the space for the VM hard drive. I still need to create the partition and move the files over.

Before I forget, here are some useful VirtualBox command line options

  • > VBoxManage list vms – shows the virtual machines registered in VirtualBox
  • > VBoxManage list hdds – shows the matching hard drives attached to the virtual machines. This command also shows the UUIDs needed for …
  • >VBoxManage modifyhd <UUID from above> –resize <size in Megabytes>

16384 Megabytes == 16.00 Gigabytes

Keep running out of space on VMs

I think I need to add more space to a VirtualBox VM loaded on one of my machines. I’m unable to load the Ubuntu updates any more. One of the error messages implies I’ve run out of free space. The VM needs more space any way, and I’ll need to remember how to bump up the VM size for another machine, so I should relearn how to do this.

I think what I need to do is this:

  • bump up the space using VirtualBox
  • use Gparted (Ubuntu desktop app) to create a new partition in that extra space
  • move the home directories to the new partition.
  • Get rid of the extra temp space and clean up

I’ve done this before about a year ago. My notes from them imply that I should not use the VirtualBox desktop app to add more memory to the virtual hard drive. My notes show the command line commands I entered to get everything to line up correctly. I don’t remember why the desktop app did not work, so I’ll try the command line.

For GParted, I found two web pages that describe that to do, one on site point ( http://www.sitepoint.com/ubuntu-12-04-lts-precise-pangolin-using-gparted-to-partition-a-hard-disk/ ) and another one on the Ubuntu help pages ( https://help.ubuntu.com/community/HowtoPartition/PartitioningBasics ). I’ll have to review them again to make sure I don’t get any surprises.

Once I’m through with GParted, I’ll follow along with this page in the Ubuntu help pages (https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Partitioning/Home/Moving) to finish. I remember this page before. The instructions are simple to follow and I understand what is being done at each step. I don’t expect any trouble from this point, but you never know. More news later.