Some notes about Digital Ocean servers

I’ve been unhappy with my current website host. My old hosting company, Verio, sold part of its webhosting business (including my websites) to another company. Verio used to provide php by default. The new host does not. I decided to try out another cloud provider, Digital Ocean, to see what they can provide.

I spent a while reviewing their help pages to prepare myself for surprises. I spent enough time on their documents site that they gave me a $10 credit when I set up a new account. Eventually, I set up an account with them and received the credit. Click on the link above to get your own $10 credit. (I’ll get some credit, too.)

Setting up a droplet is just as described in their setup page. It’s almost exactly the same. Digital Ocean provides more machine size options ($320/month and above) for monster machines with dedicated CPUs and/or high RAM requirements. I don’t need that. I want a small Ubuntu machine that I can use to hold the domain names that I have and don’t use.

I like their suggestion to use public/private keys. I did not realize that each machine should use exactly one key pair. I had set up key pairs for Bitbucket, Github and now Digital Ocean. I was unable to log in automatically with the key pair until I replaced the public key with the default public key I created on my machines a long time ago. I still set up a password for the non-root account. I still have to key it in for ‘sudo’ stuff, which is annoying, but login works automatically and well.

I decided to follow their instructions for setting up a server firewall. I’m not familiar with IP tables and Digital Ocean recommends using ufw. I followed their instructions and discovered that new terminal windows were not logging in automatically with ssh. It kept timing out for some reason. I rolled back my ufw changes, but I still had trouble with logins. I sent in a help ticket and received some additional instructions that look like they work. They have so far, so that’s good.

I continued setting up the server. Apache installed without trouble, even though they recommend Nginx. (I don’t know Nginx yet.) I skipped MySQL because I did not need it for a placeholder / testing site. I followed their instructions for installing PHP and … discovered that Ubuntu 16.04 does not have default repositories for PHP5. It has repos for PHP7. I had to add an additional repo for the PHP 5 files. Not a big deal, once I knew what was going on. Finally, I have PHP5 installed on the placeholder site. For a placeholder site, I like it.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s